About Nerd Drivel

Knowledge is power. Empower yourself! I've been a computer nerd since I was 7 years old. I started in the days of the Power PC with a Commodore 64. As I grew so did my knowledge and curiosity, anything I could take apart with a screw driver would be opened and investigated. Later on I went on to graduate from a post secondary Computer Engineering program. Today I work in an IT department for a mid sized company, I get to tinker and toy with gadgets of all types, fuelling my passion for technology and software. I understand computers more than I understand some people.

CredSSP, Windows RDP connection error.

Recently Microsoft changed the security in regards to Remote Desktop connections. This was to address a vulnerability that existed with RDP that allowed an attacker to take complete remote control of a Windows PC.

With this came some security changes and you will need to add a registry entry to your machines if you get Security Connection errors in Windows OS and Server OS when you try and use RDP to connect to an older remote machines. When I say older I mean Windows 7 and Server 2008, Windows 8.x might be affected as well.

For more information on CredSSP see this Microsoft article: https://support.microsoft.com/en-ca/help/4056564/security-update-for-vulnerabilities-in-windows-server-2008

In Windows 7 the error looks like the following…

win7

In Windows 10 the error is a little more detailed and looks like this…

To get past this issue all you need to do is add the following registry entry to your machine.

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\System\CredSSP\Parameters]
“AllowEncryptionOracle”=dword:00000002

Alternatively here is a reg file in a zip file that you can just run. Make sure you reboot after adding the registry entry.

https://drive.google.com/file/d/13vDjZQqwEGZYNL5wnbig5iOzOs26EKn-/view?usp=sharing

I created a group policy on my Domain to push this registry entry to all computers.

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Disabling Automatic Updates on Server 2016

The server 2016 GUI does not provide a means to disable Windows Updates and by default the updates are set automatically download. There is a spot for updates in the GUI but it is a placebo. If you wish you can disable Windows Updates and run them manually at your hearts content, you need to do this via the sconfig text based applet.

Do the following. Start Powershell as admin and run the sconfig command. This is the server configuration text based applet.

Once you have run this applet option 5 is for Windows updates. For productions server the Manual option is probably the best choice.

A pop up will notify you of the changes once selected and from here on in all your updates will have to be downloaded and installed manually.

Virtual Machine Queues and Broadcom NIC Issues

Broadcom network adapters have a very big issue in Windows with Hyper-V. The issue is so big that at one point a year or so ago when I deployed a new Hyper V server with Broadcomm NICs my domain users were unable to use VPN properly due to a crippling network latency. I’m sure Broadcom is aware of this problem and the issue is documented all around the internet. The problem are Virtual Machine Queues, and on Broadcom network adapters they delay traffic to the VM and create latency issues.

There is a quick fix for that though. All you need to so is disable Virtual Machine Queues on your network adapter. It takes 5 min to fix.

To fix it, start up Powershell as an Administrator, then check to see if VMQ is enabled on your adapters, specifically anything by Broadcom.

Run the following command;

Run the Get-netAdapterVMQ

If you see True in the Enabled column, disable VMQ with the following command;

Disable-NetAdapterVmq -Name 'Adapter Name'

See the below example for reference. I even included an error where my name of the adapter wasn’t being caught because there was a space in the name. Use single quotes on the name to avoid this.

Windows PowerShell
Copyright (C) 2014 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

PS C:\Windows\system32> Get-netAdapterVMQ

Name                           InterfaceDescription              Enabled BaseVmqProcessor MaxProcessors NumberOfReceive
                                                                                                        Queues
----                           --------------------              ------- ---------------- ------------- ---------------
Front End                      Microsoft Network Adapter Mu...#2 True    0:0                            16
Embedded LOM 1 Port 4          Broadcom NetXtreme Gigabit Eth... True    0:0              16            16
Embedded LOM 1 Port 3          Broadcom NetXtreme Gigabit E...#2 True    0:0              16            16
Embedded LOM 1 Port 2          Broadcom NetXtreme Gigabit E...#4 True    0:0              16            16
Embedded LOM 1 Port 1          Broadcom NetXtreme Gigabit E...#3 True    0:0              16            16
Back End(PA)                   Microsoft Network Adapter Mu...#3 False   0:0                            0
Back End(NeoTech)              Microsoft Network Adapter Mult... False   0:0                            0


PS C:\Windows\system32> Disable-NetAdapterVmq -Name Front End
Disable-NetAdapterVmq : A positional parameter cannot be found that accepts argument 'End'.
At line:1 char:1
+ Disable-NetAdapterVmq -Name Front End
+ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    + CategoryInfo          : InvalidArgument: (:) [Disable-NetAdapterVmq], ParameterBindingException
    + FullyQualifiedErrorId : PositionalParameterNotFound,Disable-NetAdapterVmq

PS C:\Windows\system32> Disable-NetAdapterVmq -Name 'Front End'
PS C:\Windows\system32> Disable-NetAdapterVmq -Name 'Embedded LOM 1 Port 1'
PS C:\Windows\system32> Disable-NetAdapterVmq -Name 'Embedded LOM 1 Port 2'
PS C:\Windows\system32> Disable-NetAdapterVmq -Name 'Embedded LOM 1 Port 3'
PS C:\Windows\system32> Disable-NetAdapterVmq -Name 'Embedded LOM 1 Port 4'
PS C:\Windows\system32> Get-netAdapterVMQ

Name                           InterfaceDescription              Enabled BaseVmqProcessor MaxProcessors NumberOfReceive
                                                                                                        Queues
----                           --------------------              ------- ---------------- ------------- ---------------
Front End                      Microsoft Network Adapter Mu...#2 False   0:0                            16
Embedded LOM 1 Port 4          Broadcom NetXtreme Gigabit Eth... False   0:0              16            16
Embedded LOM 1 Port 3          Broadcom NetXtreme Gigabit E...#2 False   0:0              16            16
Embedded LOM 1 Port 2          Broadcom NetXtreme Gigabit E...#4 False   0:0              16            16
Embedded LOM 1 Port 1          Broadcom NetXtreme Gigabit E...#3 False   0:0              16            16
Back End(PA)                   Microsoft Network Adapter Mu...#3 False   0:0                            0
Back End(NeoTech)              Microsoft Network Adapter Mult... False   0:0                            0

WMI Filtering in Group Policy

Item level targeting is great and all, it works well for granular targeting. But with Item Level Targeting you are limited to only Active Directory components.

WMI or Windows Management Instrumentation consists of a set of extensions to the Windows Driver Model that provides an operating system interface through which instrumented components provide information and notification.

What if I told you you could set up policies that that allow you to target specific users, specific user names, specific hardware, and specific software. Even specific hardware types. You could deploy hardware specific drivers on your domain using WMI flitering.

It’s actually pretty slick, and far superior to anything that SNMP can offer. It is a very powerful tool set for a Sys Aadmin. The level of control for WMI filtering is absolutely amazing and robust. But is it secure? Well that depends, it can be, if you follow best practices there is no reason it shouldn’t be.

WMI filters are similar to SQL queries, for example…

select Version, ProductType from Win32_OperatingSystem where
 ((Version like "10%") and (ProductType = 1))

The above version 10 followed by the wildcard character will select Windows 10 and Server 2016 operating system versions. ProductType = 1 means the desktop OS version, where as type of 3 would mean the server OS version. Finally ProductType = 2 means that the machine is a Domain Controller.

select Version, ProductType from Win32_OperatingSystem where
 ((Version like "6.1%") and (ProductType = 1))

The above is for Windows 7.

select Version, ProductType from Win32_OperatingSystem where
 ((Version like "6.3%") and (ProductType = 3))

Finally the last one is Server 2012 R2.

Note that the name space that this is available in, is root\CIMv2.

If you want to find and query WMI you can use the official tool available from Microsoft, it’s called The WMI Code Creator tool and it’s available here. If the link is dead just search for it. An alternative to this is the NirSoft SimpleWMIView available here, and Wmi Explorer available here.

WMI Code Creator looks something like the following. It allows you to browse all the WMI possibilities and search for property values of WMI classes. For obvious reasons you will need the .NET framework installed on your machine.

 

Creating a WMI Filter is simple. Open up your Group Policy Management application, expand your domain and at the bottom you should have a folder named WMI Filters. In this folder you can also see a collection of WMI Filters and which policies they are applied to.

Right click this folder and select New…

Give your Filter a name and Description, then click Add.

Finish by clicking OK and Save. You have now created a WMI Filter for Server 2016 all versions.

Now you need to apply the filter to a policy. Locate a policy in your Manager, and in the right pane on the bottom under WMI Filtering now you can select the filter you just created.

That’s pretty much it, you can play around with the WMI Code Creator and see that you can do some very granular filtering with this. You can create filters based on OS, CPU, Disk drives anything that you can think of. This is a very powerful tool and if you’re familiar with SQL queries you should have no trouble coming up with some complex filters.

Specific Host Name:

root\CIMV2 – Win32_ComputerSystem – DNSHostName = ‘YourHostname’

 

As a side note if you are a C# .NET developer you can also benefit from WMI using the System.Management namespaces in Visual Studio. You will need to add a reference to it in your Visual Studio project. This allows you to query Microsoft Operating System hardware and retrieve statistics from said machine.

Sample C# Code:

 ManagementObjectSearcher processor = 
 new ManagementObjectSearcher("root\\CIMV2", 
 "SELECT * FROM Win32_PerfFormattedData_Counters_ProcessorInformation");
 foreach(ManagementObject query in processor.Get())
 {
 coreValues.Add((string)query["PercentProcessorTime"]);
 }

Home Media – Part 4 – OSMC/KODI/XBMC

This is part 4 of a series of write ups called Home Media.

Part 1 – The NAS build

Part 2 – The Setup

Part 3 – The Rip

Now that you have a whole infrastructure setup for streaming in your house, what do you do?

First thing is first, you will need some sort of hardware. Be it an old laptop, a Odroid-C2 box, an Android Box or a Raspberry Pi3. Then you will be creating two xml files called Sources.xml and/or AdvancedSettings.xml. These two files are responsible for media sources and database connections respectively. With Advancedsettings in the mix you can also add an SQL instance to your setup.

The benefit to the SQL database is that if you have multiple devices in your home, you can pause your content in one room and resume it in another. Your library info is stored in one place, the databse, and can be easily backed up and restored using software such as HeidiSQL. Library updates can be performed using headless installations of KODI and are picked up by all other devices on the network connected to the DB.

Easiest way to run a headless installation of KODI is to use the LinuxServer.io docker container which they have created and is available from here https://github.com/linuxserver/docker-kodi-headless. This works well if you have a server at home. If you are running a Pi or Odroid device with KODI on it this might not be necessary, since these are always on low power devices. Potentially you can send all update requests to these boxes.

For Laptop and Android Boxes go to their respective app stores and install KODI. On Linux you have to install KODI manually. Head over to Kodi.TV and they have all the packages you need over there. For further installation instructions head over to the KODI wiki.

In this example I will be working with v17.x or K, code named Krypton. For the Odroid-C2 and RaspberryPi I suggest heading over to LibreELEC and grabbing the installation source from there. The equivalent LibreELEC version of KODI version 17 is 8.x. For the Odroid and RPi you will need to image the storage device, SD card or eMMC storage. On Windows use the Rufus software. Alternatively LibreELEC has built their own installation tool to install the OS on a storage device. For further installation instruction for LE suing their tool go to their wiki site. An alternative to LibreELEC is OpenELEC, this has builds for devices that Libre does not support.

Note that when you boot in to KODI for the first time, specifically LibreELEC, you should enable SAMBA and SSH. SAMBA will be useful for copying the xml files to your KODI box later on.

Installation:

Once you have installed Rufus and plugged your SD/eMMC card to your computer start Rufus and locate the drive letter that is the storage device of your choosing.

In Rufus click the drop down list and select DD Image, then to the right of it click the image icon.

Rufus will prompt for a file with a Open selection window. Select the appropriate image and click Open.

It will warn you about erasing all the data on the storage device, accept the prompt and let Rufus run through it’s thing.

Once complete close Rufus and check that your file structure of the SD card look something like the above. The storage device is now ready to be plugged into your hardware and you can proceed to boot it.

Database:

Install the database of your choice. I use MariaDB, it’s a free open source SQL software. It was forked after MySQL was bought out by Oracle. I run this in a docker on my home server. However you like to proceed pick the installation of your choice.

The docker container is available on the Docker hub and can be found here: https://hub.docker.com/_/mariadb/

To run the docker with persistent storage run the following docker commands.

First you need to pull the installation.

docker pull mariadb:latest

An alternative to the latest tag you can use the versions available on the site, 5, 10… etc. Then you will need to run the docker using the docker run command. It will look something like the follwing.

docker run -d –restart=always –net=bridge –name mariadb -v /my/own/datadir:/var/lib/mysql -e MYSQL_ROOT_PASSWORD=SomePassword -e MYSQL_USER=kodi -e MYSQL_PASSWORD=kodi -p 3306:3306 mariadb:latest

For Unraid 6 you can use a Docker MariaDB template available here:

https://github.com/Exist2Resist/docker-templates/tree/master/exist2resist

There are 3 key commands you need to execute on the database after you have installed it. You can find the database installation instructions for various OS versions on the KODI wiki.

Make sure after you setup a sa or root user on the database you write down the password. After this log into the database and run the following 3 commands.

  1. Type in: CREATE USER 'kodi' IDENTIFIED BY 'kodi'; and press return
  2. Type in: GRANT ALL ON *.* TO 'kodi'; and press return
  3. Type in: flush privileges; and press return

These commands create a user with the name kodi and password kodi. This will be used in your KODI installations via the advancedsettings.xml file to connect to the database.

sources.xml:

The sources file is used to connect KODI to your network shares and sources for your media and music. A sources file has the <sources></sources> tags at the beginning and end of the file and should look something like the following…

smb: stands for samba, your other option would be nfs which is the file sharing protocol in linux. Also if you notice the above shares are accessible to anyone on the local network. If you want to password protect these shares go ahead but you will need to change the <path>, using the example above to smb://username:password@Tower/Music/.

The sections (<music>), name (<name>) and path(<path>) are all mandatory in the example above. Every other field is optional.

Note that if you are using a database to store the media information you do not need the sources.xml file on all your instances of Kodi. You will only need both files on the instance which updates the library and database. All other instances only need to connect to the database. The database contains a files table which has an idPath column that stores the path to the files.

For further detail on the sources xml you can head over to the KODI wiki, http://kodi.wiki/view/Sources.xml

Note that with the database in the mix you should enable the option to wait for network before starting KODI. This is only available in OpenELEC and LibreELEC builds of KODI. I have not been able to find this in the vanilla KODI, but that should not matter as more than likely these installations will usually run on a box that requires manual KODI start anyways.

advancedsettings.xml:

The advanced settings file has the <advancedsettings></advancedsettings> tags at the beginning and end of the file and below is an example of what the advancedsettings.xml should look like. This file is very fickle and it has a lot of options it can take. Use the example below as a starting point.

<videodatabase> and <musicdatabase> point to an sql instance via the IP address username and password. Default port for sql is always 3306.

Also if you want to pause and resume your playback at different locations in your home, include the <importwatchedstate> and <importresumepoint> tags and set them to true under the <videolibrary> tag. Under the same tag <backgroundupdate> updates the library without any popups of notifications. <recentlyaddeditems> sets the amount of new items that will be visible under the TV Shows and Movies sections. Default I believe is 25, you can set this to whatever.

In version 17+ of KODI the cache tag is pretty important. If you are experiencing the odd buffering interruption while watching content from your file server set this option and have all content buffer.

In previous versions of KODI this option was set under the network tag. Sections 2.8.4 and 2.8.3 of the Advancedsettings.xml wiki, respectively.

Cache buffers the file in memory instead of the local storage. If you notice a lot of stutter on your streams, especially with version 17 if you add this sections the performance should greatly improve. Mind you if you have terrible internet and you are using external or http video sources there are no guarantees. If want to do this you will need to do some math first, use this bit calculator if you’d like, don’t trust google they mess the calculation and conversion up badly. But more on that later.

The cache section looks something like the following.

<cache>
<buffermode>1</buffermode>
<memorysize>477184000</memorysize>
<readfactor>10</readfactor>
</cache>

Buffer mode with value of 1 will cache any content streamed in KODI. Local or remote it doesn’t matter.

Memory size is where you will need to do some converting and calculating. So the max memory size depends on your system and this value can not exceed a third of your max free memory. So if your device is running while playing content with 300 MB of free memory your max memory size should be 100MB or 104857600 bytes. If you don’t adhere to the 1:3 ratio rule, there is a high probability that your box will crash.

Read factor is the speed at which the content gets buffered at or read into memory at. If a files average bit rate is 6MB/s, with a read factor of 10 the file will be read at 60MB/s into the cache buffer. Average bit rate multiplied by the read factor. Take your network bandwidth into consideration when calculating this. If not specified the default is 4.

For further details on the advancedsettings xml you can head over to the KODI wiki http://kodi.wiki/view/Advancedsettings.xml

File placement:

If you enabled SAMBA and SSH on your KODI device you can navigate to the Userdata share of the device and place both xml files there. Even though you don’t need both it is recommended that you do. The network name or IP will be required for you to navigate to the shared folder. You should have enabled SAMBA when you set up your KODI box. During said setup you gave the installation a name, if you kept it default navigating to \\LIBREELEC via file explorer should bring up the box’s shares.

Open up the Userdata folder and you should see some folders and 4 xml files.

Place both the XML files in here.

Alternatively you can SSH into your box using putty or similar software. Default user name is root and the password is libreelec.

Once in there you can use either vi or nano to create both the files and paste the contents. The location of where the file should be stored are as follows.

/storage/.kodi/userdata/

You can create the files manually by performing the following commands in SSH.

nano advancedsettings.xml

Then paste the contents of the file into the window and click ctrl + x, this will prompt you if you want to save the file, type in y and hit enter to confirm the file name.

Repeat the same for the sources file.

A very important step, you will need to set KODI to wait for the network when it boots if you are using a db connection. If you do not do this your library will not populate.

In your add-ons select the LibreELEC Configuration add on.

Then set the Wait for network… option and set it to 10 second. There has not been an instance where 10 seconds has not been enough for me.

Your KODI box should now be ready to go, reboot and enjoy.

Veeam VM Backup software restore agent timeout fix.

Veeam Backup and Replication software is a very popular Virtual Machine backup software at the moment. It is very robust and offers a lot of options for backing up and moving your virtual infrastructure off site.

Recently after setting up the software I discovered that after about 11 hours of a restoration processing of a 4TB MSSQL vm backup the software would hang and the restore would fail.

After about 3 weeks of back and forth with Veeam support and digging into the software my entire infrastructure and even my SAN. The developers came back with a registry entry fix that prevents the software from hanging on restore. This registry needs to be added to the Veeam Server,  Veeam Proxies, and Veeam Repositories.

Essentially you need to add this to any and all installations of Veeam in your infrastructure. Then all you do is Restart the Veeam Transport Service, named Veeam Data Mover Service. Alternatively reboot any and all servers.

The registry entry you need to add is as follows;

name: HangedAgentKillTimeout
path: HKLM\SOFTWARE\Veeam\Veeam Backup Transport
type: REG_DWORD
value: 28800

You can also put the following in a batch file if you’d like.

Reg Add “HKLM\SOFTWARE\Veeam\Veeam Backup Transport” /v HangedAgentKillTimeout /t REG_DWORD /d 28800

QLED vs OLED, not the same tech.

Update: OLED is not without it’s issues. One issue is reverse vignette, this is where the screen appears darker on the inside than the outside. Vignette is an effect that you see in some photos and even in movies, inside is brighter than the outside. Sometimes done purposefully, other times it’s due to the use of a wide angle lens, it bends the light in such a manner that it creates the effect. You can remove reverse vignette on an OLED panel by adjusting the OLED light, contrast, and brightness of the screen. This is not noticeable in content however, and you really have to look for it in order to see it.

Update 2: Turns out OLED does have Burn-In after all. Like Plasma OLED has Burn-In issues with the colour Yellow and derivatives of it. Static content like hud elements in Video Games and logos from TV channels that contain Yellow, Red, and certain Greens will burn this in into the screen over a long period of time. There is a solution however, turn your OLED LIGHT down to about ~40.

Vignette effect.

I just saw what Samsung is charging for their new QLED TV sets, and are they insane? They are marketing their new television line as some form of LED technology, then pricing it similar to what LG is charging for their OLED sets. Well let me tell you, one is better than the other. I’m writing this article in the hopes that you won’t get fooled in to buying one of those over priced LCD screens from Samsung.

There are two types of OLED (Organic Light Emitting Diode) technologies. W-OLED and RGB-OLED. Samsung bet all it’s money and research on RGB OLED, and lost. They have since dropped out of the OLED panel race. Due to RGB-OLED high price and degradation of the blue OLED pixel this technology proved to be too expensive to manufacture for large format displays. LG opted for the W-OLED or White Oled technology, which is a white LED with RGB filters. LG won, this is the perfect OLED technology for large format displays and soon other manufacturers will follow LG in their footsteps.

After dropping OLED panels as a display technology Samsung released new branding for their LCD panels, they called this QLED or Quantum Dot Light Emitting Diode. The description of this technology is somewhat based on a lie or false promise. I believe this branding is meant to fool the consumer into believing they are buying something that the technology is not. There are no Light emitting diodes or LEDs inside the QLED panels. QLED is a passive LCD screen with a quantum dot colour filter and LED edge lighting. The only difference between QLED and an LCD/LED TVs (LED is an LCD panel with LED edge lighting) are the quantum dot filters, everything else is business as usual.

QLED sounds like OLED, but OLED it is not. While the W-OLED and QLED technologies on paper may look and sound the same, the name is where this similarity ends. I believe that Samsung QLED technology is inferior to LGs OLED and Samsung will lose a lot of market share due to it’s price and the underlying technology of using LCD panels.

OLED is an emitting technology, each pixel is capable of producing it’s own light. Benefits to this are that OLED panels have infinite contrast ratios as each pixel can be individually turned off and on. Blacks are true black, similar to what plasma and crt televisions were capable of offering in the past. OLED is a natural replacement for Plasma Television owners and Home Theater enthusiasts. OLED screens can be viewed in a bright room, even when you have sunlight hitting the screen.

QLED on the other hand is a LCD panel with a passive colour filter(quantum dot layer) and an edge LED array which is used as a back light for the screen. If sunlight hits your screen it renders the image unwatchable. QLED sets might be held to a higher production standard than normal LCD panels however they still come with issues such as banding, light bleed, uniformity concerns, and motion blur. Even with local dimming that QLED panels possess, they have a lot of light bleed. In bright rooms, unlike OLED, QLED screens wash out and become unwatchable. In dark rooms the light bleed from the back light detracts from the viewing experience.

OLED sets have virtually no motion blur, no light bleed, no banding, near perfect uniformity, and are perfect for viewing at an angle with virtually no colour shift. I say virtually because sometimes the light refraction coating on top of the screen can make whites appear with a slight pink/purple tint. This happens primarily when viewing the screen at an angle. The tint shift effect of the refraction coating is not very significant, and even with this shortcoming of the LG OLED screens they still look much better than any high end LCD panel I have laid eyes on. Have a look at the picture it demonstrates the coating tint shit effect. Note the left side of the screen is slightly warmer than the right side.

Yes quantum dots much like OLED do produce more saturated colours. But at the price Samsung wants to charge for a set you are better off picking up an OLED set from 2016. The 2016 LG B6 series can be picked up for around $ 2500 USD, and I guarantee you the picture quality is better than anything Samsung can offer for twice the price in their QLED lineup. Sony and others are also getting into the OLED Television game and some more sets are on the way to market. OLED prices are being driven down and they are becoming more affordable. QLED might soon be a technology of the past. If Samsung is not able to decrease the price and improve the quality of QLED displays OLED will be the clear winner. Even with some of the OLED shortcomings, such as brightness fading, this technology has a lot more benefits than QLED. I use mine as a monitor too, while there is some image retention I have not noticed it and retention on W-OLED is not permanent. OLED sets are closer to the picture quality of CRT and Plasma televisions than any LCD on the market right now. Also SDR (vs HDR on Samsung) content looks much better on an OLED panel.

The bottom line is Samsung could not afford to stay in the OLED game with their RGB-OLED tech. Now Samsung is trying to sell you an inferior technology marketed as something that it can not compete with. W-OLED screens are cheaper to produce and produce a better visual experience.

Update: There have been some cases of Burin-in with LG OLED TVs. The culprit is the colour Yellow and some derivatives of it. So Red and Green can also cause the issue, the closer to yellow these colours get the worse the problem. LG is denying any warranty claims on Burn-In on the OLED screens. Same issue is plaguing the Google Pixel 2 that carries LGs OLED screens.

So if you own a LG, Sony, or Panasonic OLED TV, one way to prevent burn in with yellow colour is turning your TVs OLED light down below 40, also change your compensation cycle to run every 2 hours instead of 4. TV channels with static colour logos are not a good fit for these TVs.

Having said this, OLED picture quality is still superior and for movie and series watching is amazing. Be aware of these short comings and like most consumers that bought Plasma TVs you can avoid the burn-in.

For more information on this issue head over to this AVSForum thread.

References:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quantum_dot_display

https://www.oled-info.com/oled-tv

http://www.businesskorea.co.kr/english/news/industry/2891-w-oled-vs-rgb-oled-samsung-lg-show-different-techs-large-displays-ces-2014