How to Create a Dell Server Update Utility (SUU) ISO

In this example we are going to walk through the creation of a Dell SUU ISO for 64-bit Windows. The SUU is crucial if you are building out Dell servers as it updates firmware and drivers.

I find the Dell documentation isn’t overly helpful so I’ve put together this quick tutorial on how to create a customized Dell SUU ISO, keep in mind this tutorial creates a Windows based installation ISO.

1. Go and download the latest Dell Repository Manager if you do not have it installed already.
http://en.community.dell.com/techcenter/systems-management/w/wiki/1767.dell-openmanage-repository-manager

2. Once installed find the icon on your Desktop and launch it.
icon

3. Once launched, you should be prompted to update some plugins, go ahead and do so. If you are prompted to update the Dell Online catalog do so as well.

4. Once the application has loaded, go to the menu bar and select Source > View Dell Online Catalog.
view_dell_catalog

5. If you have not updated the Dell Online Catalog, you should now be prompted to update, click Yes.
sync_db

6. Under Dup Format check off Windows 64-bit to narrow down the bundles.filter_catalog

7. Check off your System Bundles based on the models you’d like the ISO to support.

8. Once these are all selected click Create Deployment Tools.deployment_tools

9. A wizard will appear, select Create Server Update Utility (SUU) > SUU to ISO. Select Next.
create_suu

10. Accept the defaults on the Select Plug-ins Select Next. You will be prompted for the SUU export location, select a folder and click OK.
create_suu_2

11. On the Summary and Finish page, review the Selected Bundles and confirm that all the appropriate models have been selected for export. Click Finish if everything looks okay. The job will be added to the Jobs Queue where the progress can be seen.
create_suu_3

Advertisements

How to Generalize a Linux VM Template

When building out an environment of any kind, you need to have a good starting base, a strong foundation and the same holds true for many things. It’s no different when building a virtual machine (VM) template to deploy in your environment in a repeatable fashion.

Recently I spent some time developing a generalized/sanitized VM template for Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) versions 6 and 7. This script should be run right before you shutdown the VM and template it for reuse.

#!/bin/bash
echo "Generalize the template..."
echo "Remove RHN system ID..."
rm -f /etc/sysconfig/rhn/systemid

echo "Create sanitized ifcfg-eth0..."
echo -en 'DEVICE=eth0\nTYPE=Ethernet\nONBOOT=yes\nBOOTPROTO=dhcp\n' > /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-eth0

echo "Clear /etc/sysconfig/network file..."
cat > /etc/sysconfig/network < /dev/null

echo "Remove SHH keys..."
rm -f /etc/ssh/ssh_host_*

echo "Remove udev rules..."
rm -f /etc/udev/rules.d/70-*

echo "Remove fixed hostname..."
rm -f /etc/hostname

echo "Clear Machine ID (SID)..."
> /etc/machine-id

echo "Remove all logs from /var/log..."
rm -rf /var/log/*

echo "Remove all logs from /root..."
rm -rf /root/*